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Career Advice on How to Become an Audiologist

General Career Information

What’s that? I can’t hear you? What? If you find yourself asking any of these questions, you might be in the need of a good audiologist. Audiologists are trained professionals that deal with all issues related to hearing, as well as balance. Audiologists work to identify hearing problems and hearing loss in patients. They also suggest a course of treatment for their patients. The field has changed in recent decades with the introduction of computers and other testing devices.
 
Audiologists are graduate educated. Most audiologists hold at least a Master’s Degree in audiology. In recent years, many states have begun requiring audiologists to hold a doctoral degree in audiology in order to practice.
 

Career Facts:

Considering the level of education required to become an audiologist, the pay is somewhat surprising. The average pay for audiologist is about $57,000, with the bottom ten percent of audiologist earning an average of $38,000. Considering the level of education that is required for the job, this rate of pay is something of a puzzle. In fact, a starting schoolteacher earns about as much as a freshly graduated audiologist. This is a fact that those who are engaged in a job search or career planning should factor in when considering this profession.

 
Audiologists work closely with the medical profession to treat and evaluate hearing and hearing loss issues. As a result, audiologists work with doctors and the medical profession in a variety of ways.
 

Career Opportunities and Job Outlook-Fair:

Those seeking an exciting career in the “can you hear this sound?” industry can expect average levels of job growth. Between now and 2016 the rate of growth is expected to be about ten percent. There are about 12,000 audiologists working nationwide, with another expected rise to about 13,000 by 2016.
 
Job Outlook is Fair  
 

A Day in The Life:

Audiologists work to evaluate those have experienced, or may have experienced, hearing loss. Not surprisingly, this means that they work with patients of all ages and find themselves working closing with doctors, hospitals and medical establishments. Much of an audiologist’s day is often spent running tests to evaluate hearing in individuals with potential hearing problems. On occasion, audiologist may find themselves evaluating noise levels within workplace environments.
 

Average Salary:

The annual earnings for audiologists do not exact reflect the level of education required for the job. In this sense, the field is something of an oddity. While audiologists are required to have a Master’s Degree or even a Doctoral Degree in Audiology, the pay can be surprisingly low. The average audiologist can expect to earn about $57,000.

$50k - $60k

 

Career Training and Qualifications:

At least a Master’s Degree is usually required for the field. Increasingly states are requiring a Doctoral Degree to work as an audiologist. While the top ten percent of earners average $89,000, this is a great deal of education and years of schooling for the level of average pay.
 
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